Twin Study Reveals Epigenetic Alterations of Psychiatric Disorders

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In the first study to systematically investigate genome-wide epigenetic differences in a large number of psychosis discordant twin-pairs, research at the Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) at King’s College London provides further evidence that epigenetic processes play an important role in neuropsychiatric disease.

Published in Human Molecular Genetics, the findings may offer potential new avenues for treatment.

Previous quantitative genetic analyses of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder reveal strong inherited components to both. However, although heritability for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder is estimated at 70%, disease concordance between twin-pairs is far from 100%, indicating that non-genetic factors play an important role in the onset of the diseases.

Dr. Jonathan Mill, lead author of the study at the IoP says, ‘We studied a group of 22 identical twin-pairs, so 44 individuals in all, one of the largest twin studies performed for any complex disease to date. In each twin-pair, one had either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Because we know that twins are genetically identical, we can rule out any genetic cause of illness in the affected twin — the aim of our study was to investigate epigenetic variations associated with these disorders.’…

by ScienceDaily staff

ScienceDaily

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110921120039.htm