Focus on Mental Health Laws to Curb Violence Is Unfair, Some Say

Pin It

In their fervor to take action against gun violence after the shooting in Newtown, Conn., a growing number of state and national politicians are promoting a focus on mental illness as a way to help prevent further killings.

Legislation to revise existing mental health laws is under consideration in at least a half dozen states, including Colorado, Oregon and Ohio. A New York bill requiring mental health practitioners to warn the authorities about potentially dangerous patients was signed into law on Jan. 15. In Washington, President Obama has ordered “a national dialogue” on mental health, and a variety of bills addressing mental health issues are percolating on Capitol Hill.

But critics say that this focus unfairly singles out people with serious mental illness, who studies indicate are involved in only about 4 percent of violent crimes and are 11 or more times as likely than the general population to be the victims of violent crime.

And many proposals — they include strengthening mental health services, lowering the threshold for involuntary commitment and increasing requirements for reporting worrisome patients to the authorities — are rushed in execution and unlikely to repair a broken mental health system, some experts say.

By Erica Goode and Jack Healy, New York Times

Full Article

Comments

  1. I think it is important to spend money on giving these individuals the right care and treatment they need at a young age, rather than spend that money on setting up a system for alerting authorities of individuals with potentially dangerous health problems.

    Ram
    Social Security Disability Help

Speak Your Mind

*