The All of Us Research Program Seeks Feedback from the Community

The All of Us Research Program will create a community of one million or more people from across the U.S. to improve the future of health. Those who join the program will contribute their health, environment, and lifestyle information over an extended period of time. By gathering information from such a large group of people,Read More

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NIMH Director’s Message: The Push for Suicide Prevention, By Joshua Gordon

I wrote in my welcome message about my priorities. First, we need to fund excellent science. Second, we should support studies that will yield benefits on short, medium, and long­term timescales. I also have three particular areas of interest: neural circuits, computational and theoretical psychiatry, and suicide prevention. Here I will discuss possible approaches toRead More

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SAMHSA provides up to $121 million for adult mental health and substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has awarded up to a total of $121 million over the next five years for mental health and substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery. These SAMHSA grants are geared toward expanding and enhancing behavioral health care services for adults across the nation. “This funding will helpRead More

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Childhood brain injury linked to adult psychiatric illness, earlier death

Young people who sustain a traumatic brain injury before the age of 25 may be more likely experience a psychiatric illness and die earlier than those who have not had such an injury, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health. The researchers also found that those who had a head injuryRead More

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Family member engagement with early psychosis specialty care

BACKGROUND: Family members of individuals with early psychosis (EP) play critical roles in their engagement with EP services, but family member experiences of those roles are insufficiently understood. Read more Print PDF

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The RAISE Connection Program: Psychopharmacological Treatment of People With a First Episode of Schizophrenia. Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the adherence of psychiatrists to the Schedule of Recommended First and Second Line Antipsychotic Medications (“Antipsychotic Schedule”), which was implemented in two Recovery After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode (RAISE) Connection Program Implementation and Evaluation Study clinics. Read more Print PDF

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Worldwide Study Seeks to Unlock the Brain’s Genetic Code; Data scientists discover seven genetic variants linked to intracranial volume, Parkinson’s disease risk, and cognitive ability

Scientists collaborating across 250 institutions in 35 countries have identified variations of the genetic code that are associated with intracranial volume, which is a reflection of the maximum brain volume an individual achieves over a lifetime. These variations were also found to be associated with a person’s individual risk for Parkinson’s disease and to cognitiveRead More

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Molecular Tool Parses Social Fear Circuit Intertwined with Aggression Hub

In its debut performance, a powerful new genetic engineering tool has revealed secrets of functionally distinct brain circuits for social fear and aggression in mice. This, even though these sets of neurons seem hopelessly intertwined. The tool, called CANE (Capturing Activated Neuronal Ensembles), helps trace distinct pathways embedded within the brain’s spaghetti-like wiring. NIMH granteeRead More

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How Health Communicators and Journalists Can Help Replace Stigma with Science

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Director Nora Volkow, M.D. blogs about how one can use science to counter the stigma of drug addiction. There are still people who believe addiction is a moral failing that could be solved if the person had more willpower. In fact, the science is clear: Addiction is a chronic,Read More

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NIDA: Nonmedical Treatment for Cocaine Addiction Shows Promise in Pilot Trial

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) projects electromagnetic fields into the brain and can be used to either increase or decrease neuronal responsiveness in targeted brain areas. Researchers have hypothesized that administering TMS to strengthen activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and downstream brain regions can alleviate cocaine addiction (see Narrative of Discovery: Can Magnets Treat CocaineRead More

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